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JIS Football Funday...






Apparently there are 500 IT related jobs up for grabs over the short to medium term. So the quest for IT-skilled workers has begun and government ministries are recruiting in earnest. I can't help but wonder if we will be able to recruit that many people in such a short time. Even if we did, would skill or talent be the primary criteria?

Update: I like Amieheidi's honest description of what she is and isn't good at. Such a talented girl that one =)

Comments

Fabian said…
Nice action shots.
AnakBrunei said…
Thanks for the kind words fabian, means a lot esp coming from a photographer of your caliber. The rest of the series can be viewed here.
s.a.s said…
high time people with the right qualification enters the right job market. a colleague of IT background has a totally different post, not even related to IT. we NEED more IT people, I know my department does.. heheh.. and I know a certain person who different qualification is holding the IT post. how weird eh...
amyheidi said…
Hello. Thanks for the compliment. =)
It's true that we need more IT people. So far, UBD only churns out IT people via the majors in the Computer Science class (>20 people for my year, though I'm not so sure about the juniors), while I don't know how many are there in ITB.
Perhaps, it is time to also look at the usually ignored minor subject when they apply for work, as most maths major in UBD take computer science as a minor.
Tina said…
This is, of course, good news to students like me. This was stressed upon us when we have field trips to government and private agencies.. that we are needed. It's nice to know that you are needed somewhere. I mean, after all the hard work you've done in 2 and a half years.

From ITB alone, I think there are about 40-70 students graduating every year? Don't quote me on that. But.. I think it's possible to recruit many people in a short period of time. Just not 500, me thinks.

Anyway, it's a little disheartening to see former CIS students from ITB become educators (not that there is anything wrong with that) rather than building systems and networks around the country, helping develop e-government.

A question to Amy Heidi, is it true, though, that most BSc in Computer Science students in UBD turn out to be mostly programmers?

By the by, I heard you on Kristal FM, talking about the lamb shank. It got me hungry after that. I believe it was lunch time? Nyeh. :P
amyheidi said…
Tina: Yup, that's true. All of my friends are programmers. They tend to focus more onto programming more than other areas, even though they also learn stuffs like webdesign. I think its because of the high number of computing lecturers that are programmers.
Tina said…
Amy Heidi: Wow, so it's not just all talk? I guess that's why most of us from ITB don't want to continue with our degrees in UBD. One, we have to start from first year if we didn't score eight merits to go to second year. Two, even if we start from second year, it'll be three years instead of two like in most universities in the UK. And lastly: we end up as programmers, in which we were avoiding in the first place. Hehe.

Sorry, I'm just rambling on.

But like I said, it's nice to know we're needed. Hee.
amyheidi said…
Tina: Oh its true, at UBD, you learn JAVA during your first year, with a seemingly cool JAVA lecturer, a local by the name of Pg Dr. Jaidi.
AnakBrunei said…
Tina: Have you tried the Lamb Shank yet? hehehe! I noted with interest your statement about avoiding being programmers... care to elaborate on why this is the case?

amyheidi: There is an acute shortage of JAVA developers worldwide and I think that may be why its given such emphasis at UBD...

s.a.s: I think for the management of IT within an organization, its more important for one to have people and management skills than technical skills. One of the former CIO's of the UK government is a historian by profession :) But when it comes to implementing and maintaining those systems, technical skills are definitely pre-requisite.

Hmmmm this is giving me an idea for a new post... hehehe
Tina said…
Amy Heidi: I had Turbo C for my first year programming course, and Java for my second and final year. For someone who doesn't like to be a programmer, I LOVE JAVA! (And not so much Turbo C, bleh.) My Java lecturer is one of the best there is, in my opinion. She's a local, too, her name's Dr. Sophiana. She's the head of school of Business and Information Technology, and I tell you.. I wish she taught every module of mine. Could Java lecturers be the coolest lecturers ever? Hehe.

Reeda: oh, it's just a passing comment. At times most of us students are not that good with logic and the language, thus we have problems with it. Other than that, if you understand the language (the way I do with Java, and not Turbo C), you're fine. But sometimes it gets a bit boring. Trust me.

And ahh, management skills. We have lecturers trying to embed that in us. I can't seem to grasp any. I guess I'm not that keen to be a manager. Yet. ;)

I haven't tried the lamb shank yet, but inshaAllah, I will soon. Sounds really nyummy from your description and all.
AnakBrunei said…
Tina: I'm pretty good with the logic bit but I SUCK big time at math heheh can't win em all. I do know how boring programming can get, I was in ITB in '91 doing CIS jua (zaman C++ and COBOL)heheh! Do convey my warm regards to Sophiana, I mean DR Sophiana, if you see her aight?
Tina said…
Hahaha, sometimes we think about it too much, leaving behind the logic. Ooh, another CIS student! Yeay! :D (But COBOL? :S) InshaAllah, I'll tell Dr. Sophiana. :)

And now, I'm definitely sure it's my lecturer in the other post. Hehe. ;)

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